Drivers Step-four Ges.m.b.h USB Devices

  1. Drivers Step-four Ges.m.b.h Usb Devices Wireless Adapter
  2. Drivers Step-four Ges.m.b.h Usb Devices Type C
  3. Drivers Step-four Ges.m.b.h Usb Devices Pc Camera
  4. Drivers Step-four Ges.m.b.h USB Devices

USB Mass Storage Device - Driver Download. Vendor:. Product: USB Mass Storage Device. Hardware Class: hdc. Search For More Drivers.: Go! DriverHive is a driver updater service that will scan your computer's installed devices, identify the best fitting drivers and provide them in an easy, convenient format. Individual drivers may be available on manufacturer websites at no charge.

Using Game Controllers over a Remote Desktop session

3 October, 2018 at 10:22am Work


Well, it’s been over six years since I last wrote on this blog! The theme could do with updating, it’s screaming “2010” at me.

So, I work from home a fair bit. Be it evenings, weekends, or sometimes during regular work hours. The setup I have for that is much like any other game company: We have a secure VPN into our work network, and we’d use Remote Desktop to control our work PC. My home PC isn’t as beefy as my work PC, so it’s nice to have the power of my work PC when compiling code, or building game data. A PC build of our game runs fine over Remote Desktop, if you size the window down it is pretty decently playable.

We make our game for “the consoles” too, so we’re able to run on those via Remote Desktop, and the platform holders also provide viewing apps to see what’s going on, on said consoles. These work pretty great, and work over a Remote Desktop session. When I’m working at home, I generally don’t find anything lacking about my dev environment (and having no office interruptions is great!). Up until now though, I did have one gripe… Controllers. We can control the PC version of the game with a mouse, but with the console builds over Remote Desktop, you’re stuck with keyboard controls, or other facsimiles of a controller. Being able to use a controller over a Remote Desktop session would be great! I was surprised to find out that it’s possible, but Microsoft for some reason disallow it by default.

Here’s how to get it working…

To be clear, I don’t claim to have come up with this myself. See the “references” section at the bottom of this page for where I found the steps. I’m just largely reproducing that information here in a more palatable form. Things didn’t work first time for me, so here I’m going over the steps in more detail to ensure that you don’t hit the same hurdles that I did.

Assumptions and Caveats

  • I’ve only tested this over two Windows 10 computers. It might work with Windows 7, or Windows 8. I’m not sure.
  • I’m told this requires at least Windows 10 Pro on each PC for the RemoteFX system to function and redirect the USB device. There are no known current workarounds for this. If it’s for work, ask your company to expense the Win10 Pro license purchase. The upgrade is a simple license key change, no long install required.
  • I’ve only tested this with controllers connected via USB cables. I don’t think bluetooth-connected controllers will work, but let me know otherwise.
    • The Xbox 360 controller, with the USB wireless dongle does work.
    • Xbox One controllers BSOD my remote PC, I do not know of any workaround for this. For game development an Xbox 360 controller seems to work with Microsoft’s “Xbox One Manager”, and functions as an Xbox One controller.
  • You have reasonable “local” administrative privileges to both computers.
    • If your work/remote computer is locked down by your I.T. department, you might still be ok. You do however need Administrative local privileges for each computer, at least to perform the required setup.

Terminology

  • The scenario that I use this setup myself, is to connect from my home computer, to the computer at my office.
  • So, the “local” computer where the gamepad is connected I’ll refer to as the “local home”.
  • The “remote” computer where I want the gamepad input relayed to, I’ll refer to as “remote work”.

Step One – GPEdit – Local Home

  • Go to the Start menu, and type “gpedit” – Run the “Edit Group Policy” app.
  • Navigate to this section:
    • Local Computer Policy -> Computer Configuration -> Administrative Templates -> Windows Components -> Remote Desktop Services -> Remote Desktop Connection Client -> RemoteFX USB Device Redirection -> Allow RDP redirection of other supported RemoteFX USB devices from this computer
  • Right-click on the entry, choose “Edit”.
    • Select the “Enabled” radio button.
    • Change the Access Rights drop down to “Administrators and Users”.
    • It should look like this:

    • Click “OK” to apply the settings.
  • Go to the Start menu, find the Command Prompt app – right-click it and “Run As Administrator”
  • At the command line, run:
    • gpupdate /force
  • You should see this output:
  • Now, reboot your local home computer.

Step Two – GPEdit – Remote Work

Drivers Step-four Ges.m.b.h Usb Devices Wireless Adapter

NOTE: You can do these steps over a Remote Desktop session, if you wish.

  • Go to the Start menu, and type “gpedit” – Run the “Edit Group Policy” app.
  • Navigate to this section:
    • Local Computer Policy -> Computer Configuration -> Administrative Templates -> Windows Components -> Remote Desktop Services -> Remote Desktop Session Host -> Remote Session Environment -> RemoteFX for Windows Server 2008 R2 -> Configure RemoteFX
  • Right-click on the entry, “Edit”. Choose “Enabled”, then click OK.
  • Back up three levels to “Remote Desktop Session Host”.
  • Navigate to this section:
    • Connections -> Allow users to connect remotely by using Remote Desktop Services
  • Right-click on the entry, “Edit”. Choose “Enabled”, then click OK.
  • Back up two levels to “Remote Desktop Session Host” again.
  • Navigate to this section:
    • Device and Resource Redirection -> Do not allow supported Plug and Play device redirection
  • Right-click on the entry, “Edit”. Choose “Disabled” (yes, DISABLED this time), then click OK.
  • Go to the Start menu, find the Command Prompt app – right-click it and “Run As Administrator”
  • At the command line, run:
    • gpupdate /force
  • You should see this output:
  • Now, reboot your remote work computer.
    • If you’re using Remote Desktop to do this, you can restart by typing this at the command line:
    • shutdown /r

Step Three – Connect from Local Home

  • Ensure your gamepad controller is connected via USB to your local home computer.
    • Open up “Control Panel -> Devices and Printers”

    • Ensure the gamepad is listed here. If it isn’t, reconnect it. If it still doesn’t work… It’s beyond the scope of this post – go try Googling!
    • You can right-click on the controller, and choose “Game Controller Settings”. Then click “Properties”, to test that your controller is functional.
  • Find “Remote Desktop Connection” in your Start Menu. Run it.
    • Click “Show Options” at the bottom.
    • Go to the “Local Resources” tab.
    • Click “More…” at the bottom. The dialog looks like this:
  • If you did everything correctly in the “Step One – GPEdit – Local Home” steps for your Home PC, you’ll see a “Other Supported RemoteFX USB Devices” section. Good stuff!
    • If you do not see “Other Supported RemoteFX USB Devices”, then you likely made a mistake on the “Step One – GPEdit – Local Home” section. Go back and try again.
  • My Dualshock 4 controller is listed as “USB Input Device (HID-compliant game controller)”, so I have selected that. Select whatever gamepad(s) you are using.
  • Connect to your remote work PC.

Step Four – Profit?

USB
  • Upon connection to your Remote Work PC, navigate to “Control Panel -> Devices and Printers”:
  • If all went well, you should see your gamepad listed here!
    • If it isn’t listed here, you likely made a mistake on the “Step Two – GPEdit – Remote Work” section. Go back and try again.
  • Your gamepad should be fully usable over your Remote Desktop session.
  • Enjoy!


Let me know in the comments section below, if there’s anything useful I have missed in this HOWTO post. I can’t provide any technical support if these steps don’t work for you. But it’s good to know if I can make any improvements to this post – to help out other folks that might run into problems that I didn’t have myself.

Cheers.

NOTE: (March 2020) Just to reiterate, I can’t provide any technical support.

References


Comment from Jeremy
Time: May 5, 2019, 10:36 am

Worked like a charm for me using SteamLink. Thanks!

Comment from radu
Time: June 5, 2019, 3:00 am

just a small correction: administrator privileges are not necessarily required to connect to the server, provided you also select, in step one, Administrators and Users, besides Enabled:
https://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/d71a1dfe-63cf-466a-abe0-1c352280221b/printers-and-remotefx-usb-redirection?forum=os_windowsprotocols
<>

See also KB 2653326 https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/2653326/some-usb-devices-are-not-available-through-remotefx-usb-redirection , in case you need to manually enable a device class for redirection.

Comment from Faraj
Time: January 16, 2020, 10:06 am

I tried this and for some reason my remote PC gets BSOD when trying to connect with my Xbox ONE controller connected to my local PC and I have the option checked to enable the controller.

Comment from Eric Milota
Time: March 13, 2020, 1:57 pm

Thanks for the info Gavin! I’ve shared this with my work mates.

Comment from Gavin
Time: March 20, 2020, 3:10 pm

@Faraj – Yeah, also getting the same now with a XBox One controller. This was working for me sometime in 2019, perhaps it broke with some recent Win10 upgrade?

FWIW, (if you’re a gamedev), an Xbox 360 Controller seems to work ok with “Xbox One Manager”.

Comment from Andy Pennell
Time: March 27, 2020, 3:52 pm

I can confirm that Windows can blue-screen if you try this with an Xbox One controller, but 360 controllers are just fine. The crash is under active investigation by the driver team. This post was super-helpful in unblocking games developers trying to work from home, thank you Gavin.

Comment from Ahmad
Time: April 20, 2020, 6:53 am

Great,
thanks for your Sharing MAN

You must have the following software components in order to start developing Android applications for ConnectCore 6:

If you already have Android Studio 2.0 or later in your computer, you can skip the first two installation steps.

1. Java SE Development Kit 7 (JDK 7)

Before you set up Android Studio, be sure you have installed JDK 7 or later. The Java Runtime Environment (JRE) alone is not sufficient.

For Linux users:

We recommend the Java OpenJDK-7 package. Depending on your distribution, you can install this package in two ways:

  • For Debian and Ubuntu distributions, issue this command:
  • For Fedora, Oracle Linux and Red Hat Enterprise Linux, issue this command:

For Windows users:

  1. Check if you already have JDK 7 or later installed on your computer. If you do, you can skip this step.
    How to check if you have JDK installed and which version
    1. Open a terminal and type the following:
    2. The version should be 7 or later. Java SE version strings have the form:
    • 1.x

    • 1.x.0

    • 1.x.0_u

    In these examples, x is the product version number and u is the update version number. For example, an installed JDK update 60 (JDK 7u60) returns:

  2. If the JDK is not installed or the version is not 7 or later:
    1. Download the Java SE Development Kit 7 at www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/downloads/jdk7-downloads-1880260.html
    2. Once the download is complete, run the executable file and follow the on-screen instructions to finish the installation process.

2. Android Studio

Android Studio provides everything you need to start developing apps for Android. Digi Embedded for Android has been validated with Android Studio 2.2.3, although newer versions should also work.

To download and install Android Studio on your computer:

  1. Download Android Studio at http://developer.android.com/sdk/index.html.
  2. Follow the steps for installing Android Studio at https://developer.android.com/sdk/installing/index.html?pkg=studio.

3. Digi Extensions for Android Studio

To download and install the Digi Extensions on your Android Studio:

  1. Open Android Studio.
  2. Open the Android Studio Settings dialog by doing one of the following:
    • Select Configure > Settings on the Welcome screen.
    • Select File > Settings from the menu.
  3. Select Plugins from the tree on the left of the Settings dialog.

Drivers Step-four Ges.m.b.h Usb Devices Type C

Note You can also access the Plugins dialog from the Welcome screen. Click Configure on the Quick Start panel and then click Plugins.

  1. Click Browse repositories at the bottom of the page.
  2. In the Browse Repositories dialog, select Digi Extensions for Android Studio from the list on the left. You can use the search box to look for the plugin.
  3. Click Install plugin on the right panel.
  4. A dialog is displayed asking whether you would like to download and install the plugin Digi Extensions for Android Studio. Click Yes.

    A dialog displays the progress of the download process.

  5. Once the download process finishes, click Close in the Browse Repositories dialog.
  6. Click OK to close the Plugins dialog.
  7. When a message appears asking you to restart, click Restart to activate the plugin.

4. SDK Add-on for ConnectCore 6

You are now ready to start developing Android applications. The Get started section provides an initial tutorial, while the Application development section gives you everything you need to start using the Digi APIX for Android extensions to create more advanced apps.

  1. On the Android Studio Welcome screen, click Configure on the Quick Start panel and then click SDK Manager.
  2. Click the Launch Standalone SDK Manager link at the bottom of the list. The SDK Manager dialog opens.
  3. Click Deselect All to uncheck any previously selected package from the list.

  4. Select Tools > Manage Add-on Sites from the main menu of the application.

    A new configuration window opens.

  5. Select the User Defined Sites tab and click the New button to add a new add-on site.
  6. Enter the following URL for the new add-on site: http://ftp1.digi.com/support/android/sdk_addon/addon.xml
  7. Click OK and then close the Add-on Sites configuration dialog. A new package named SDK Add-On for ConnectCore 6 appears under Android 5.1.1 (API 22).
  8. Select the new package and click Install 1 package.
  9. Accept the License Agreement and click Install.
  10. Once installation is complete, close the SDK Manager.
  11. Restart Android Studio.

You are now ready to develop Android applications using the Digi APIX for Android.

Drivers Step-four Ges.m.b.h Usb Devices Pc Camera

5. Google USB driver

You need the Google USB Driver for Windows if you want to perform adb (Android Debug Bridge) debugging with your ConnectCore device.

  1. Download the Google USB driver at http://developer.android.com/sdk/win-usb.html.
  2. Once you have downloaded the USB driver, perform the following instructions to install it, based on your Windows version:
Windows 7 or later

To install the Google USB driver on Windows 7 or later for the first time:

  1. Unzip the downloaded file.
  2. Connect your Android-powered device to your computer's USB port.
  3. Right-click on Computer from your desktop or Windows Explorer, and select Manage.
  4. Select Device Manager in the left pane of the Computer Management window.
  5. Locate and expand Other device in the right pane.
  6. Right-click the device name and select Update Driver Software to launch the Update Driver Software wizard.
  7. Select Browse my computer for driver software and click Next.
  8. Click Browse and locate the USB driver folder, called usb_driver, which appears after you decompress the downloaded file.
  9. Click Next to install the driver.
Windows Vista

To install the Google USB driver on Windows Vista for the first time:

Drivers Step-four Ges.m.b.h USB Devices

  1. Unzip the downloaded file.
  2. Connect your Android-powered device to your computer's USB port. Windows detects the device and launches the Found New Hardware wizard.
  3. Select Locate and install driver software.
  4. Select Don't search online.
  5. Select I don't have the disk. Show me other options.
  6. Select Browse my computer for driver software.
  7. Click Browse and locate the USB driver folder, called usb_driver, which appears after you decompress the downloaded file.
  8. Click Next. Vista may prompt you to confirm the privilege elevation required for driver installation. Confirm it.
  9. When Vista asks if you'd like to install the Google ADB Interface device, click Install to install the driver.