Sony Computer Entertainment Port Devices Driver Download

Symptoms

  • Looking for support on Sony Electronics products? Find firmware updates, software and driver downloads.
  • Any of these actions may void the PS4 system warranty and affect your ability to obtain warranty services and repair services from Sony Computer Entertainment. It is highly recommended to always use the most recent driver version available.

Your CD or DVD drive is not seen in File Explorer (called Windows Explorer in Windows 7 and earlier versions of Windows), and the device is marked with a yellow exclamation point in Device Manager. Additionally, after you open the device's Properties dialog box, one of the following errors is listed in the Device status area:

Sony does not guarantee the operation of a USB jack extended with a hub in combination with audio devices that are not operation-certified. Internet connection. To use the audio CD database service (Gracenote) Note. This application is provided for users of supported audio devices manufactured by Sony. The following devices can be used to watch the SHOWTIME streaming service: TV & Streaming Devices. AMAZON Fire TV Fire TV Stick. ANDROID LeEco TV NVIDIA SHIELD SONY BRAVIA Hisense TV Xiaomi MiBox. APPLE Apple TV (3rd generation +) CHROMECAST. FACEBOOK Portal TV. LG SMART TV (with webOS) PLAYSTATION 4.

  • Windows cannot start this hardware device because its configuration information (in the registry) is incomplete or damaged. (Code 19)

  • The device is not working properly because Windows cannot load the drivers required for this device. (Code 31)

  • A driver (service) for this device has been disabled. An alternate driver may be providing this functionality. (Code 32)

  • Windows cannot load the device driver for this hardware. The driver may be corrupted or missing. (Code 39)

  • Windows successfully loaded the device driver for this hardware but cannot find the hardware device. (Code 41)

This issue may have occurred after one of the following situations:

  • You upgrade the Windows operating system.

  • You install or uninstall CD or DVD recording programs.

  • You uninstall Microsoft Digital Image.

There are various reasons why a CD or DVD drive is not detected. The resolutions that are listed in this article may help solve some instances but not all instances of this problem. You may also need to contact your hardware manufacturer for assistance with your hardware.

Resolution

For each of the following methods, click on the header, and it will open to show you more info:

Method 1: Windows 7 and 8.1 - Use the Hardware and Devices troubleshooter

For Windows 10, skip to Method 2.

In Windows 7 and 8.1, to open the Hardware and Devices troubleshooter, follow these steps:

  1. Press the Windows logo key + R to open the Run dialog box.

  2. Type control in the Run dialog box, then press Enter.

  3. In the Search box in Control Panel, type troubleshooter, and then click Troubleshooting.

  4. Under the Hardware and Sound item, click Configure a device. If you are prompted to enter an administrator password or provide confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.

If your problem is not solved, try the next method.

Method 2: Check BIOS settings and chipset drivers

  1. Verify the drive is activated in the BIOS. BIOS systems vary by device. If you are not sure how to verify the drive settings in your device’s BIOS, contact the manufacturer of your device.

  2. Also, verify with the manufacturer of the computer if the drive came with it, or the manufacturer of the drive if it was purchased separately that the chipset drivers for the device are current.

If your problem is not solved, try the next method.

Method 3: Update or reinstall the driver

To update the driver, search for the driver on the device manufacturer's website, and then follow the installation instructions on the website.
To reinstall the driver, follow these steps:

  1. Press the Windows logo key + R to open the Run dialog box.

  2. Type devmgmt.msc in the Run dialog box, then press Enter. If you are prompted for an administrator password or for a confirmation, type the password, or select Allow

  3. In Device Manager, expand DVD/CD-ROM drives, right-click the CD and DVD devices, and then select Uninstall.

  4. When you are prompted to confirm that you want to remove the device, select OK.

  5. Restart the computer.

After the computer restarts, the drivers will be automatically installed.
If your problem is not solved, try the next method.

Method 4: Remove and reinstall IDE/ATAPI drivers

To remove and reinstall IDE/ATAPI driver, follow these steps:

  1. From Start, search for Device Manager. Open Device Manager from the search results, and select the View menu. Choose Show Hidden Devices.

  2. Expand IDE/ATAPI Controllers, and then:

    • Select and right-click ATA Channel 0, and then click Uninstall

    • Select and right-click ATA Channel 1, and then click Uninstall

    • Select and right-click Standard Dual Channel PCI IDE Controller, and then click Uninstall

    • If there are additional entries, right-click them and then choose Uninstall

  3. Reboot the device.

After the computer restarts, the drivers will be automatically installed.
If your problem is not solved, try the next method.

Method 5: Fix corrupted registry entries

This problem may be caused by two Windows registry entries that have become corrupted. To use Registry Editor to delete the corrupted Registry entries, follow these steps:

  1. Press the Windows logo key + R to open the Run dialog box.

  2. Type regedit in the Run dialog box, then press Enter. If you are prompted for an administrator password or for a confirmation, type the password, or select Allow

  3. In the navigation pane, locate and then select the following registry subkey:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESYSTEMCurrentControlSetControlClass{4D36E965-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}

  4. In the right pane, select UpperFilters.
    Note You may also see an UpperFilters.bak registry entry. You do not have to remove that entry. Click UpperFilters only. If you do not see the UpperFilters registry entry, you still might have to remove the LowerFilters registry entry. To do this, go to step 7.

  5. On the Edit menu, select Delete.

  6. When you are prompted to confirm the deletion, select Yes.

  7. In the right pane, select LowerFilters.
    Note If you do not see the LowerFilters registry entry, go to the next method.

  8. On the Edit menu, select Delete.

  9. When you are prompted to confirm the deletion, select Yes.

  10. Exit Registry Editor.

  11. Restart the computer.

Note: To use this method, you must be logged on to Windows as an administrator. To verify that you are signed in as an administrator, bring up the Control Panel, select User Accounts, and then choose Manage User Accounts.
Important:

  • Follow the steps in this section carefully. Serious problems might occur if you modify the registry incorrectly. Before you modify it, back up the registry for restoration in case problems occur.

  • After trying this method, some apps, such as CD or DVD recording software, might not work correctly. If so, try uninstalling and reinstalling the affected app. Check with the creator of the app to see if there is an updated version.

If your problem is not solved, try the next method.

Method 6: Create a registry subkey

To create the registry subkey, follow these steps:

  1. Press the Windows logo key + R to open the Run box.

  2. Type regedit in the Run box, then press Enter. If you are prompted for an administrator password or for a confirmation, type the password, or select Allow.

  3. In the navigation pane, locate the following registry subkey:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESYSTEMCurrentControlSetServicesatapi

  4. Right-click atapi, point to New, then select Key.

  5. Type Controller0, and then press Enter.

  6. Right-click Controller0, point to New, and then select DWORD(32-bit) Value .

  7. Type EnumDevice1, and then press Enter.

  8. Right-click EnumDevice1, select Modify....

  9. Type 1 in the Value data box, and then select OK.

  10. Exit Registry Editor.

  11. Restart the computer.

Notes

Sony
  • To use this method, you must be logged on to Windows as an administrator. To verify that you are signed in as an administrator, bring up the Control Panel, select User Accounts, and then choose Manage User Accounts.

  • This method should be used on Windows 7, Windows 8 or 8.1, or Windows 10 version 1507. The issues fixed by this method shouldn’t occur in Windows 10 1511 or later.

Important: Follow the steps in this method carefully. Serious problems might occur if you modify the registry incorrectly. Before you modify it, back up the registry for restoration in case problems occur.

(Redirected from Ps2 linux)
Linux for PlayStation 2
DeveloperSony Computer Entertainment
OS familyUnix-like
Working stateDiscontinued
Initial release2002; 19 years ago
PlatformsPlayStation 2 SCPH-50000 and earlier
Kernel typeMonolithic (Linux kernel)
Default user interfaceWindow Maker
Official websiteweb.archive.org/web/20100524023205/http://playstation2-linux.com:80/ (archived from the original)

Linux for PlayStation 2 (or PS2 Linux) is a kit released by Sony Computer Entertainment in 2002 that allows the PlayStation 2 console to be used as a personal computer. It included a Linux-based operating system, a USB keyboard and mouse, a VGA adapter, a PS2 network adapter (Ethernet only), and a 40 GB hard disk drive (HDD). An 8 MB memory card is required; it must be formatted during installation, erasing all data previously saved on it, though afterwards the remaining space may be used for savegames. It is strongly recommended that a user of Linux for PlayStation 2 have some basic knowledge of Linux before installing and using it, due to the command-line interface for installation.

The official site for the project was closed at the end of October 2009[1] and communities like ps2dev[2] are no longer active. There is still a small group of enthusiasts that meets on Freenode in the channel #sps2.

Capabilities[edit]

The Linux Kit turns the PlayStation 2 into a full-fledged computer system, but it does not allow for use of the DVD-ROM drive except to read PS1 and PS2 discs due to piracy concerns by Sony. Although the HDD included with the Linux Kit is not compatible with PlayStation 2 games, reformatting the HDD with the utility disc provided with the retail HDD enables use with PlayStation 2 games but erases PS2 Linux, though there is a driver that allows PS2 Linux to operate once copied onto the APA partition created by the utility disc. The Network Adapter included with the kit only supports Ethernet; a driver is available to enable modem support if the retail Network Adapter (which includes a built-in V.90 modem) is used. The kit supports display on RGB monitors (with sync-on-green) using a VGA cable provided with the Linux Kit, or television sets with the normal cable included with the PlayStation 2 unit.

The PS2 Linux distribution is based on Kondara MNU/Linux, a Japanese distribution itself based on Red Hat Linux. PS2 Linux is similar to Red Hat Linux 6, and has most of the features one might expect in a Red Hat Linux 6 system. The stock kernel is Linux 2.2.1 (although it includes the USB drivers from Linux 2.2.18 to support the keyboard and mouse), but it can be upgraded to a newer version such as 2.2.21, 2.2.26 or 2.4.17.

Sony Computer Entertainment Port Devices Driver Download

Open-source applications[edit]

Contents of the Linux kit; the hard disk is already installed inside the machine, and the network adaptor is attached to the back.

Sony Computer Entertainment Port Devices Driver Downloads

The Linux kit's primary purpose is amateur software development, but it can be used as one would use any other computer, although the small amount of memory in the PS2 (32MB) limits its applications. Noted open source software that compiles on the kit includes Mozilla Suite, XChat, and Pidgin. Lightweight applications better suited to the PS2's 32MB of RAM include xv, Dillo, Ted, and AbiWord. The default window manager is Window Maker, but it is possible to install and use Fluxbox and FVWM. The USB ports of the console can be connected to external devices, such as printers, cameras, flash drives, and CD drives.

With PS2 Linux, a user can program their own games that will work under PS2 Linux, but not on an unmodified PlayStation 2. Free open source code for games are available for download from PS2 Linux support sites. There is little difference between PS2 Linux and the Linux software used on the more expensive system ('Tool', DTL-T10000) used by professional licensed PlayStation game programmers. Some amateur-created games are submitted to a competition such as the Independent Games Festival's annual competition. It is possible for an amateur to sell games or software that they develop using PS2 Linux, with certain restrictions detailed in the End User License Agreement. The amateur cannot make and sell game CDs and DVDs, but can sell the game through an online download.

Sony Computer Entertainment Port Devices Driver Download Windows 7

Distribution[edit]

As of 2003, this kit is no longer officially sold in the US due to the entire allocation of NTSC kits being sold out, but it is available through import or through an auction site, such as eBay. Some incorrectly speculate it was used as an attempt to help classify the PS2 as a computer to achieve tax exempt status from certain EU taxes that apply to game consoles and not computers (It was the Yabasic included with EU units that was intended to do that).[citation needed] Despite this, Sony lost the case in June 2006. The kit was released in the spirit of the earlier Net Yaroze. PlayStation and Sony ended their support of hobbyist programmers with the support of Linux on the PlayStation 3 being discontinued.

Model compatibility[edit]

The original version of the PS2 Linux kit worked on only the Japanese SCPH-10000, SCPH-15000 and SCPH-18000 PlayStation 2 models. It came with a PCMCIA interface card which had a 10/100 Ethernet port and an external IDE hard drive enclosure (as there is no room inside the unit). This kit cannot be used with any later model PS2 (which includes all non-Japanese models) because these models removed the PCMCIA port.

Later versions of the PS2 Linux kit use an interface very similar to the HDD interface/Ethernet sold later for network play (the later released Network adaptor was also usable with the kit, including the built-in 56k modem.) This kit locates the hard drive internal to the PS2, in the MultiBay. With this kit, only the SCPH-30000 model of PlayStation 2 is officially supported. The kit does though work equally well with models newer than SCPH-30000 with the exception that the Ethernet connection tended to freeze after a short period of use. Thus the newer SCPH-50000 PlayStation 2 model will only work correctly with PS2 Linux with an updated network adapter driver, which must be transferred to the PlayStation 2 HDD by using either an older model PlayStation 2 to transfer the driver or a Linux PC with an IDE port. Both methods involve swapping HDDs. This is due to the inability to use USB Mass Storage devices with the relatively old kernel (version 2.2.1) shipped with the kit.

The slim SCPH-70000 PlayStation 2 model does not work with PS2 Linux at all, due to the lack of a hard drive interface, though a very few early models in this revision had solder pads of an IDE interface on the motherboard that could be used (but required modding of the console, thereby voiding its warranty.) Even so, it is possible to network boot from a PXE server.

PS2 Linux installation DVDs are region encoded, as are all other PS2 game discs. A European/PAL disc will be rejected by an NTSC PlayStation 2 game system; however this is only at boot time: if the user has a mod that allows them to load a PAL disk, then the PS2 Linux boot loader supports both PAL and NTSC Linux (read the documentation to determine the button presses), so once they are past the 'DVD not supported', they can boot Linux and then later start X Window in NTSC mode.

Unofficial support[edit]

Ever since the discontinuation of the PS2 Linux Kit and some time before that there has been a large, less active group who have tried and succeeded to run the Linux operating system through other methods, most notably using the KernelLoader Linux loader developed by Mega Man since 2008 where they have copied the necessary kernel files onto removable storage or DVDs formatted as Video DVDs due to Sony's anti-piracy efforts which restrict any data DVDs and loaded them through the program.

Through this method it has become possible to use custom Linux distros and other UNIX-like operating systems compiled for the PlayStation 2 and this has enabled users to use more compatible Linux kernels with smaller footprints and programs specially designed for the console. These methods often require the use of PS2 exploits such as Free MCBoot which allows the end user to boot from the PlayStation 2 memory card and launch custom made homebrew applications packaged as ELF files and other exploits such as SwapMagic etc. however these tend to void the warranty as some require the opening of the PlayStation 2 console itself.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^https://web.archive.org/web/20100114201506/http://playstation2-linux.com/forum/forum.php?forum_id=1251
  2. ^'PS2DEV.ORG: Playstation Programming'. Archived from the original on February 2, 2008.

External links[edit]

Entertainment
  • Sony's PlayStation 2 Linux Community Archived From The Original
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